Monday, September 30, 2013

Arizona Sunset

I took a photo last year in Arizona at sunset of the adobe house next to our condo. The little bird sitting on the top was what attracted my attention. The trees lined along the horizon line let the sunset show through their limbs.

It was interesting cutting out the trees for this as I concentrated on just cutting out the negative space. After I finished I wondered if this was really a good representation of negative space or a silhouette. What do you think?

7 comments:

fndlmous said...

Given the colours you have used, I see a sunset silhouette. But is a silhouette not just a specialized use of negative space.A quiet pleasing piece.
Pat f in Winnipeg
aka fndlmous

fastfriday said...

Marilyn,
I love your sky fabric. You have made the negative space the star of your show. Isn't it fun to cut the negative shapes for a change? I find I get so absorbed in my work when I approach it this way.
Karol

Louise Page said...

I really like it Marilyn and agree that a silhouette employs focusing on the negative space. This is an interesting challenge because we have to visualize and emphasize the background which is so opposite of how we usually construct a piece. It does truly exercise the other side of our brain. The feel of the southwest which you achieved is not only done through the negative shape, but also by the rich sky fabric which you chose. Well done!

fastfriday said...

I agree that the negative space here gets all the attention. The dark silhouette simply defines the shape we are viewing as the sky. Without you explanation of what it represents I wouldn't have known it was a house. I could be cliff or anything I'd call it abstraction so I think it works well. And what gorgeous fabric. Kathie Briggs

fastfriday said...

It's lovely. Pam Clark

Meena said...

It is great..I love the colors, too!

Tobi said...

This shows what I call "silhouette time", that part of the evening when details of things are lost except for their outline against the sky -- except for that extraordinary redness, which makes its own powerful statement. Interesting piece.